Produce Music and Become a DJ Producer

Video Alex Rome

Here is few great information if you are thinking about getting in to the producing with a software and writing information what to do and to expect . to be honest it was the only i had kept me going and building along the way great sounds.

We Extremely recommend young generation,  Logic and FL Studio for software production studio, music fans should use their spare times to dig in this giant music making gadgets, Remember with incredible benefits.

1. Learn an instrument. You don’t have to be a virtuoso to be a music producer, but training your ear and learning musical theory will hugely benefit your career. You should also try to compose your own songs, master tempos, or perhaps even learn to play from sheet music; understanding music from the other side of the soundboard will make you much better equipped to hear its full potential. Consider these basic instruments:
Piano/Keyboard. Probably the most versatile instrument for a producer, being able to noodle on the pianohow-to-make-electronic-music is huge. Whether you’re just trying to work out a concept or want a particular phrase recorded, a piano is almost indispensable.
Guitar. Learning the guitar will help you easily flesh out chords and immediately become relevant to rock and popular music.
Bass. Underrated but essential, the bass will help you lead the rhythm section and create a solid foundation for your productions.

2. Master the technology. To create and manipulate music, you’ll need to learn how to use a soundboard and as many music-processing programs as you can. If you don’t already have some background in sound production, a good sequencer program to start off with is Cubase.
Sequencer software programs like Cakewalk Sonar, Reason, and Pro Tools help music producers arrange and tweak the music that they record. Hip-hop and dance producers may wish to use FL Studio, which could be used for pop as well.images-1
If you’re thinking about producing hip-hop music, think about investing in a sampler. The MPC60, SP1200, and S950 are all popular with “golden age” hip-hop producers like Pete Rock and DJ Premier
3. Know the basics of mixing. Know what it means to mix a track: how to blend all the disparate sounds together into one mellifluous mix.
Know the difference between “in the box” and “out of the box.” In the box just means you’re mixing solely on a computer program; out of the box means that you’re mixing with a soundboard and other non-computer equipment to achieve your sound.
Know the difference between stereo mix and mono. Stereo mixes represent two different tracks in the same song, one for the left ear and one for the right; mono represents a single sound for the track.
Know what to put in the center of your mix. Bass guitar and vocals usually want to stay in the center of your mix — not off to any one side. Other instruments and production elements can usually be panned slightly to the left or right side to create a fuller sound
4. Become a student of music. Take your scholarship seriously. Music producers are in the business of making music, often with the help of other songs. Hip-hop producers in particular, whose job it is to take samples from other songs and rework them into a different beat, need to be voracious music students. If you’re not a student of music, you’ll soon find that you’re limiting yourself unnecessarily.

5. Think about what sounds would fit well together. You job as a music producer is to make fascinating, intriguing, soul-shattering music. Often, this means taking exploring the way that different sounds and different genres interact.music-production
George Martin, the illustrious producer of the Beatles, introduced what we now call “World” music into the popular canon. Martin helped mesh the sitar into lush pop songs. This was truly East meeting West.

6. Create some music. Try doing whatever feels best: Punk, Ska, Rock, Rap, R&B, Country, Funk, Jazz, and the like. In the beginning, focus on mastering one style of music. This will allow you to make a name for yourself in one particular genre before eventually moving onto different musical styles. Because they often involve less instrumentation, Hip-Hop, R&B, and Pop are the easiest to start off with.
Eventually, try experimenting with more genres. The more genres you become fluent in, the broader your horizons will be (and the more clients you’ll get). Don’t overextend yourself too early, however. Have one genre down pat before you move onto the next one.

7.Rework an old favorite. Take a known song — preferably one that has been minimally engineered — and give it your own flavor. What kind of potential does it have? How can you make it better? What new vision do you have for the song to transform it into something utterly different?
Make several versions to get a feel for the possibilities. Make a Reggae version of “The Wall” perhaps, or work an obscure jazz tune into a Hip-Hop beat. Don’t be afraid to think big here.

8. Collaborate with other music producers. Collaborations have produced some of the most memorable music in the canon. Don’t be afraid to go up to a producer you admire and ask him or himages-4er if they’d like to work with you. Collaborations succeed because you can use the other producer’s strengths to mask your weaknesses, and hopefully use your own strengths to mask theirs.

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Start networking. Tell your family and friends you’re producing music. Create business cards. Post bulletins around your neighborhood. If your prices are reasonable, you’ll get clients in no time. Charge cheaply per hour or per song.
It might be good to get your feet wet with a friend or family member. Do you have a buddy who is a great singer? An uncle who has a knack for playing the tuba? Produce them and keep examples of your work to show prospective clients. (Remember to keep family and business separate, though.)
If nothing exciting comes up, offer to volunteer your services to establish your reputation. There’s nothing bad about working for free, unless you’re being exploited. A really good first impression on a volunteer job could even earn you a paycheck if your work is too good to be free.

Get an internship at a production company. Sure, it’s tough work, but you might get some free time in a real recording studio. In the meantime, you’ll make friends in the business (and bring home that paycheck).
Start low on the totem pole if necessary; the point is to get your foot in the door. The harder you work (and more cheerfully you do it), the likelier you’ll be to get noticed.

Get an education. Take night classes to earn your degree if necessary. If music production doesn’t work out, you have something to fall back on.images-2

Harness the amazing power of the internet. It used to be that you had to forge personal connections in order to get your music heard. Now, if you use the internet adeptly, you can quickly make an impression both locally and globally, if that’s what you want.
Put your music up on a music website, such as Bandcamp. Curate it furiously; only put your best work up, and keep your page(s) stocked with new and different material to keep fans excited.
Use social networks to get the word out about your music. Social networks deliver viral success to hundreds of artists, even if that success is short-lived. Use — don’t abuse — your social network with updates, promotions, and free stuff. They’ll thank you for it.images-3

Save up. Now that you have a working knowledge of the business, a steady source of income, and a sizeable client base, you can start your own studio. If your sights are set higher, you might even move to a different city to try out for the big league.

Warnings
You won’t get enough money to live off of in the beginning, so find a job that’ll make ends meet and produce in your spare time.
Producers make two things: music and sacrifices.

Wikihow – youtube should become your partners along the way.

Good luck

About Media Emperor

You need leverage. Whether it’s artwork, mixing, cinematography, or promotion, you must have something else to offer. I have an extensive background in the bar/restaurant/nightclub mainly i grow up in the Hospitality industry, Nationally and Internationally, however now my focus is on Internet Marketing, Promotions, Music Productions and Mentoring, DJing Organising shows and wear tons of other hats in the industry. Hakan Nurhak.
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